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TCM tips: 5 foods to relieve dry eyes, sore throat, and other negative effects of haze

Find out what tasty, easy-to-find everyday foods you should eat to protect your health now that the haze is back.
 

TCM tips: 5 everyday foods to relieve dry eyes, sore throat, and other negative effects of haze

Photo: Liu Chen-Chia / 123rf

CHRYSANTHEMUM

How is it beneficial?
Chrysanthemum can help relieve irritated sore eyes.

How should you consume it?
Put a few pieces of chrysanthemum flowers into a cup and pour in hot water. Let it sit for 20 minutes before drinking the tea.

 

WHITE FUNGUS

How is it beneficial?
White fungus can nourish the lungs and is good for relieving the throat dryness and dry cough that are associated with haze.

How should you consume it?
Pre-soak the white fungus for 20 minutes. Bring it to the boil, then simmer for 15 minutes before consumption. You can add a bit of rock sugar for taste.

 

Also from Simply Her: TCM tips: 5 best everyday foods you should consume for the hot weather

 

ASIAN PEAR

How is it beneficial?
Asian pear has nourishing properties that help to alleviate dryness in the eyes, nose and throat.

How should you consume it?
The most straight forward way is to eat it as a fruit. You can also place sliced pear in a bowl with just enough water to cover, add some rock sugar, then steam for 15 minutes until the pear is soft. 

 

GREEN BEAN

How is it beneficial?
Good for clearing heat, green bean can relieve the “heaty” symptoms that presents itself as sore eyes, dry throat and cough.

How should you consume it?
Use a ratio of 1 cup green beans to 8 cups water. Soak it in cold water for 3 to 4 hours, bring to the boil, then simmer for 45 minutes. You can add in a bit of rock sugar for taste. 

 

WATER CHESTNUT

How is it beneficial?
With its heat-dissipation and nourishing properties, it can soothe dry eyes and throat, and ease coughing symptoms.

How should you consume it?
Eat it as a fruit or cut it into smaller pieces and boil it.

 

Lee Hui Min is a full-time physician at the NTU Chinese Medicine Clinic.

 

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