A food processor is a time-saver for heavy-duty prep. We slice, shred, puree, and pulse our way through these four mean machines.


Review: Food processorsEditor’s Rave: Kenwood Multipro Excel FP980

$999, from Tangs in Singapore

Attachments: Five discs (to slice, shred, grate and julienne), a metal whisk, a dough hook, three bowls (1.75, 2.9 and 4 litres), a 1.5-litre glass blender, a mill, and a citrus press.

SPEED It took just 15 seconds to pulse three digestive biscuits into fine crumbs, as well as puree a tomato.

WHAT I LIKED It was the fastest of the four tested. A cucumber was sliced evenly while a carrot was finely julienned. It is one of two machines with a storage box for the attachments, and the only one with a built-in weighing scale. Cleaning it was easy.

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE There were some leftover chunks, though not as many or big, compared to the rest. It was hard to remove the bowl from the motor unit – I had to exert a lot of pressure and try several times. It was also the noisiest.

VERDICT 8.5. The fastest and most efficient, with the biggest bowl of the lot. But it’s pricey and noisy.

 

Review: Food processorsBest Value: Philips Viva Collection HR7761
$169, from Harvey Norman and Courts, both in Singapore

Attachments: Five discs (to slice, shred, grate and emulsify), a dough blade, a 2-litre bowl, a mini chopper and a 1.2-litre blender.

SPEED It pulsed digestive biscuits into fine crumbs in 20 seconds and pureed a tomato in 10 seconds.

WHAT I LIKED It worked fast. Cucumber slices came out evenly thin, while a carrot was well shredded. It was relatively quiet – I could hardly hear it. It rinsed off easily, too, without residue. Suction cups keep the unit in place on the kitchen countertop.

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE It left behind small, uncut pieces of carrot. While setting it up was easy, I had difficulty attaching the slicing blade, which was also hard to remove.

VERDICT 8. Basic, affordable and the most compact, it processed most food well. If only the blades were easier to assemble.

 

Review: Food processorsMagimix Cuisine 4200
$699, from www.rawlicious.asia

Attachments:
Five discs (to slice, shred, grate and julienne), a dough blade, a whisk, three bowls (1.2, 2.6 and 3 litres), a blender, a citrus press and a juice extractor.

SPEED It pulsed biscuits into fine crumbs in 30 seconds and pureed a tomato into a smooth pulp in 20 seconds.

WHAT I LIKED
Like the Kenwood and Philips machines, it sliced cucumber into thin slices. It came fully assembled – I just needed to insert the blades, which were neatly arranged in a storage box. Changing and cleaning them were easy. It purred slightly louder than the Philips machine, but the noise was bearable.

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE It didn’t shred carrots as finely as the other machines, and left some pieces of the vegetable behind.

VERDICT 7.5. Fuss-free, but didn’t grind certain foods as well as the others.

 

Review: Food processorsBraun Multiquick 5 K 700
$329, from major department stores in Singapore

Attachments: Five discs (to slice, shred, grate), a French fries disc, a kneading hook, a multi-purpose blade (for blending, chopping and mixing dough), a whipping tool, two bowls (0.75 and 2 litres), a citrus press and a juice extractor.

SPEED It took 30 seconds to turn biscuits into tiny crumbs, and 20 seconds to puree a tomato.

WHAT I LIKED The quietest of the lot. The cucumber slices came out evenly thick, while carrots were julienned into fine shreds. It came with two grinding bowls attached to the motor unit, saving me time with assembly. I had no problems fixing and unfixing the blades.

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE It didn’t process the cucumber and biscuits as well as the others – a chunk of cucumber and bits of biscuits were left behind. It’s easy to clean, but it’s the only one with carrot stains on the white blade cover (I was warned about it though, while reading the manual) after I had scrubbed it down, which I could remove with cooking oil.

VERDICT 7. Quiet and quick, but didn’t process as well as the rest.

 

All shops are in Singapore. This article was originally published in Simply Her January 2013.

All product and pricing information was correct at the time of the magazine’s publication. We advise readers to check with the store for the latest availability and pricing information.