Taiwanese pop idol Show Luo is quick to deny allegations that his fans are trouble-makers in the light of a recent online spat which saw Hong Kong actor Anthony Wong attacked for apparently slighting Luo.

“Actually, my fans are very, very well-mannered,” the 33-year-old singer says in Mandarin in a telephone interview from Taiwan with Singapore media to promote his 2013 World Live Tour here next month.

“There’s a lot of talk and sharing online that is irresponsible. There are a lot of people with nothing better to do who stir up conflicts online. For example, they might not be my fans but pose as them to insult other singers or celebrities.”

He continues harshly: “These people are sick in their minds so I don’t really bother about them.”

Show Luo: Troublemakers not my fans
PHOTO: UNUSUAL ENTERTAINMENT

The cyberspace feud began last June when Wong, 50, star of Infernal Affairs (2002), was mistakenly believed to have insulted Luo for unruly behaviour at an airport when a man showed Lo the middle finger.

But Wong claimed innocence and wondered on Weibo: “Who is Show Luo?” This question caused an onslaught of angry attacks from netizens, allegedly Luo’s fans.

Despite Wong’s clarifications that he knew of Xiaozhu, Luo’s nickname which literally means “little pig” in Chinese, but was truly ignorant of his actual name, the feud still escalated when Wong implied Luo’s fans are “flies surrounding dung”.

The feud continued online as netizens became increasingly hostile up even after Luo’s shoutouts for fans to remain calm.

However, he insists that his true fans are polite and dismisses the majority of those who continually stir up trouble and conflicts online as irresponsible users of social media who are not his actual fans.

The fact is, he must have enough true fans in Singapore, for his concert here next month is his fourth since 2007, and two of the most expensive categories of tickets – Category 5 ($198) and 6 ($168) – are sold out.

At the Singapore Indoor Stadium, however, he will not be repeating his much-talked-about 4.5m jump onto the stage, which was seen in Taiwan.

He says: “It’s a shame but there won’t be such a stunt in Singapore because of the limitations of the concert venue. We do have other exciting performances prepared, though.”

Still, local fans can take comfort in the knowledge that he is in “prime condition” and does not require special training to build up his strength.

“I can even handle four concerts in two days,” he adds.

However, he has not put this claim to the test yet, his record being two concerts in one day in Taiwan last month for his current tour, which is already a feat for an artist whose repertoire consists mainly of fast-paced dance tracks.

While his body may hold up well under the strains of the hectic touring schedule, his vocal cords seems to be little more prone to wear.

His voice broke during the song “Man Flying In The Sky” during his last Taiwan concert in Taipei on Jan 6, causing him to shed tears and request to sing the tune again.

Asked about this, he chalks it up to his pursuit of “100 per cent effort” for his fans.

Fans who cannot wait to see him in concert on March 1 can catch him in cinemas now. He makes an appearance in Stephen Chow’s film Journey To The West as the comical Empty Prince.

Show Luo: Troublemakers not my fans
Show Luo in Journey to the West. PHOTO: GOLDEN VILLAGE PICTURES

Says the Taiwanese star, who claims he has long admired Chow: “I’m very happy to have a chance to act in his film. To be able to appear in his film is a huge honour for me.”

Like a truly smitten fan, he further reveals that he now has Chow’s number and that the two are friends who can joke around on set.

“I can even give him a hug.”

OVER THE LIMIT: SHOW 2013 WORLD LIVE TOUR

Where: Singapore Indoor Stadium

When: March 1, 8pm

Admission: $88, $138, $168, and $198 from Sistic (call 6348 5555 or go to www.sistic.com.sg)

This article was first run in The Straits Times newspaper on February 14, 2013. For similar stories, go to sph.straitstimes.com/premium/singapore. You will not be able to access the Premium section of The Straits Times website unless you are already a subscriber.