Photo: Kenneth Wong

 

Hermes is known for its colourful and coveted 100 per cent silk scarves with designs created by freelance artists from all over the world. But ever wondered how the designs are reproduced onto the iconic scarves?

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The story starts in 1948, when the French luxury house first gained access to a new production and printing technique for its scarves, known as "flat screen" or "Lyonnais" painting. In the printing process, each screen is set on the silk in a specific order, then the colour seeps through the perforations in the gauze and the design gradually appears. The technique gives exceptional printing quality and allows Hermes to introduce new designs and increase the number of colours used for its scarves.

The combination of good quality silk and vivid designs meant that for decades, we are all accustomed to dutifully sending our Hermes scarves to the dry cleaners to preserve the integrity of the material and the vibrancy of the colours.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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That step is now officially over - if you get one of Hermes' new Carre Wash scarves, that is.

While it is printed in exactly the same technique as the classic Carre scarves, the new Carre Wash is also pre-washed before being sold. The result is a scarf with a "relaxed, velvety and mattified touch, with a slightly faded and perfectly broken-in vintage look" that can also safely go in the washer and dryer.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The only thing you have to remember: Put the washer and dryer on the delicate and low-speed cycles. From $600.

ALSO READ: 6 WAYS TO WEAR A SCARF

 

A version of this story first appeared in the September 2018 issue of Her World.

PHOTOGRAPHY KENNETH WONG

STYLING BRYAN GOH

HAIR ALVIN FOH

MAKEUP KENNETH LEE, USING YSL BEAUTE

MODEL JULIA KIM, AVE

DRESS HERMES