Image: Chainless Brain

 

It’s not hard to understand why Alverina Wijaya, 27, local jeweller from label Chainless Brain, is all for 3-D printing: it makes possible what is creatively hard to do while keeping the process cost-effective and ensuring that designs are perfectly reproduced.

“It used to be that only highly skilled craftsmen could create complicated designs with intricate details, but with 3-D tech, you can print almost any design as long as you know how to work with the software. The possibilities are endless,” says Wijaya, who studied jewellery design at Raffles Design Institute in Singapore, and fashion marketing and management at ISEM in Paris before running Chainless Brain full-time in 2013.

 

Image: Chainless Brain

 

The benefits don’t stop there: such jewellery can be tougher than its handcrafted counterparts, too. “It depends on the design, but 3-D printed jewellery is typically created in one piece rather than with separate pieces soldered together, so joints are stronger.”

 

Image: Chainless Brain

 

Printing is also ideal for designs that require the most precise measurements. For example, one of Wijaya’s recent works was a wedding band that fits seamlessly into a matching engagement ring, so the customer can wear both on one finger without having to stack them.

 

Image: Chainless Brain

 

How it works:

  • The design is first conceptualised and sketched on paper.
  • A 3-D model is created on 3-D modelling software.
  • The printer then prints out a wax model.
  • The wax model is used to make a plaster mould.
  • Molten metal is poured into the mould.
  • Customers can choose from these materials: sterling silver, 18K gold, 24K gold, or platinum.
  • When the metal hardens and the mould is removed, the jewellery is ready.
  • The piece is then polished and plated if required.

 

Wijaya also designs ready-to-wear jewellery (some of which are created with 3-D tech too). Enquire about Chainless Brain’s customisation services or browse her collection of RTW pieces at www.chainlessbrain.com.

 

This story was first published in the June 2017 issue of Her World magazine.